Federal Police to continue work, says new justice minister

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 Humberto Filho/Cecom-MPBA)

Prosecutor Wellington César Lima e Silva, recently named the new justice minister, said Tuesday (Mar. 1) there is no reason to believe a change is coming in the short run for the Federal Police, which is linked to the ministry. Foto: Humberto Filho/Cecom-MPBA

Prosecutor Wellington César Lima e Silva, recently named the new justice minister, said Tuesday (Mar. 1) there is no reason to believe a change is coming in the short run for the Federal Police, which is linked to the ministry. He said the Federal Police is to keep up its work as it is, and that it is going to be the job of the ministry to “keep a watchful eye on its natural progress.”

During an event held by the National Council of Justice this morning, Welling Silva met once again with the current minister, José Eduardo Cardozo, who is to take office as Attorney-General.

“I’ve had a preliminary meeting with Minister José Eduardo and [Federal Police] Director-General Leandro Daiello, and I’ve had the best impression possible.” Silva believes the Brazilian institutions are mature enough not to undergo changes along with a new state of affairs. “The Federal Police is to continue its work as it has been up to now,” Wellington said.

Early in the afternoon, while talking to journalists on his way out of the Justice Ministry building, Wellington Silva avoided answering whether or not there had been any pressure leading to Cardozo’s departure, and said he is not alarmed by the criticism against his appointment.

“I think concerns are understandable, but they’ll soon see they’re unfounded,” he argued.

José Eduardo Cardozo went on to argue that naming Wellington was not an attempt to protect the Workers’ Party (PT) from the investigations carried out by the Federal Police under Operation Car Wash, which probes into corruption allegations at Petrobras. “The new minister is a person strongly committed to the law, the Constitution, and republican attitudes. Furthermore, President Rousseff’s advice is clear. It’s always been and will always be: the Constitution and the law should be complied with. The new minister fits this profile perfectly; he’s someone I respect and admire deeply,” Cardozo pointed out.

He justified his departure saying that, after five years in charge of the Justice Ministry, “material fatigue” is just natural.

“There comes a point in time where there must be some ventilation,” he said.

Translated by Fabrício Ferreira

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